Amador County Hospital Building (No. 148 National Register of Historic Places)

The Amador County Hospital Building in Jackson was built in 1890 and was the third hospital to be built in the county. The first county hospital was in a private home, and another was built in 1860. This hospital was built to accommodate a growing population.

The bid to construct the building was advertised by the Amador County Board of Supervisors in May 1887. Contractor C.W. Swain submitted plans and specifications, but the plans were not signed for another year because the location of the County seat was under contention. After the plans were signed, C.W. Swain was contracted to construct the building and another contract was awarded to C.E. Fournier to build a kitchen and dining room for the hospital. In May 1901, Lincoln Vandament was awarded with a contract to construct a brick annex, which was completed that same year.

In 1972, the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The unique architectural style, with Spanish influences, a wrap-around balcony,  delicate columns and it's unchanged appearance led its nomination. Little has changed about the building with the exception of a brick annex constructed in 1901 and an interior remodel to accommodate County offices and public hearings. The style of the building is just one of a few in the Mother Lode region that remain.

In the 1970s and 80s, the Amador County Historical Society sought to preserve the building. Today the building is used as the Amador County Sheriff's Office. The fact that this building continues to be used speaks to the integrity of the design of the building and stands as a lasting reminder of the early days of Amador County history. The old Amador County Hospital Building is located at 708 Court Street in Jackson.

Amador County

The eastern slope of Amador County begins at Kirkwood’s historic stage stop. The relatively narrow county is aligned between the Mokelumne and Cosumnes rivers and roughly follows an important emigrant trail route. Amador County was once a rich gold mining county, and many of the county’s towns began as gold mining camps. The largest Native American grinding stone with 1,185 mortar holes and dozens of petroglyphs is in Amador County at the Indian Grinding Rock State Historic Park, which also houses the Chaw’se Regional Indian Museum. Amador County has a booming wine country with over 35 small wineries in the foothills.

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Location

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Latitude: 38.352883 Longitude: -120.767888 Elevation: 1238 ft

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About this Establishment

California Points of Historical Interest

California Points of Historical Interest are sites, buildings, features, or events that are of local (city or county) significance and have anthropological, cultural, military, political, architectural, economic, scientific or technical, religious, experimental, or other value.

Points of Historical Interest designated after 1997 are recommended by the State Historical Resources Commission, and are also listed on the California Register.

Historical resources that are designated as Points of Historical Interest are not designated as Landmarks. Points of Interest are of local significance, while Landmarks are of statewide significance. Points that are granted Landmark status are retired from their Points of Interest designation.

To be designated as a Point of Historical Interest, a resource must meet at least one of the following criteria:

1) Is the first, last, only, or most significant of its type within the local geographic region (City or County)

2) Is associated with an individual or group having a profound influence on the history of the local area

3) A prototype of, or an outstanding example of, a period, style, architectural movement, or construction or is one of the more notable works or the best surviving work in the local region of a pioneer architect, designer, or master builder.

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Time Period Represented

1890s

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