Bodie State Historic Park

Bodie State Historic Park is a genuine California gold mining ghost town. Visitors can walk down the deserted streets of a town that once had a population of nearly 10,000 people. The town is named for Waterman S. Body (William Bodey), who had discovered small amounts of gold in hills north of Mono Lake. In 1875, a mine cave-in revealed pay dirt, which led to the purchase of the mine by the Standard Company in 1877. From 1877 to 1888, the community swelled to more than 10,000 residents and produced over $35 million in gold and silver.

Only a small part of the town survives, preserved in a state of "arrested decay." Interiors remain as they were left and stocked with goods. Designated as a National Historic Site and a State Historic Park in 1962, the remains of Bodie are being preserved as they were when the town was abandoned more than 50 years ago. Today this once thriving mining camp is visited by tourists, howling winds and an occasional ghost.

The Cemetery Trail is a gravel/soil surfaced trail which is approximately ¼ mile. The trail starts at the historic site main parking area and ends at the park cemetery.

Restrooms and water are the only available services so be sure to pack a lunch, bring sunscreen, your camera, and a jacket for your Bodie outing.  Bodie is California Historical Landmark No. 341.

Location – Directions Bodie is located on State Route 270, seven miles south and east of Bridgeport off of US 395. From U.S. 395 take State Route 270, and go east 10 miles to the end of the pavement. Continue 3 miles on an unsurfaced road to Bodie. The last 3 miles can at times be rough. Reduced speeds are necessary.

Location

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Nearby
Latitude: 38.2111743 Longitude: -119.0096212 Elevation: 8418 ft

Seasons Accessible

Bodie is open all year. However, because of the high elevation (8,375 feet), it is accessible only by skis, snowshoes or snowmobiles during winter months. Snowmobiles must stay on designated roads in the Bodie Hills.

Hours Open: 9 am to 6 pm in summer (May 15 - Oct 31); 9 am to 3 pm in the winter (Nov 1 - May 14). Museum open during the summer hours.

Fees

$7 for adults 17 and older, $5 for children ages 6 to 16, Children 5 and under are free.

ADA Accessibility Notes

The fully protected facilities and high desert conditions here may challenge persons who have limited mobility. Visitors with limited mobility who notify staff upon arrival may be able to arrange drop-offs close to the vis

Pet Friendly Notes

Dogs are allowed, but they must be on a leash at all times. Dogs are not allowed in buildings (museum, stamp mill, video room, etc.)  Owners of unleashed dogs who refuse to leash them risk being cited.  Since leaving our furry loved ones (read: dogs) in cars exposes them to the risk of heat exhaustion, the park allows limited access for leashed and well-behaved dogs.  There are bowls of water at some locations in the park. Please check with the park ranger for current regulations.

Comments

I love this place!

John, 8/14/2012

Can you camp here overnight?

tanya kristine, 9/16/2014

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